Kicking Up Into Headstand and Other Bad Advice

queen

Sitting at my dark-wood roll-top desk, legs crossed under me on a grey armless chair, I turn my head to see Queen on SiriusXM radio, Another One Bites the Dust. I keep it on the 80’s on 8 channel because, you know. The volume is muted so I have to look at the album cover to see what’s playing. It makes no sense, I know, but neither does a lot of things.

When I was twenty-four, I worked at Dillard’s salon. Retail cosmetology is the absolute worst, the only consolation the multitude of stores in which to spend money while I await the promised clientele. At the same time, I dated an idiot who I let convince me I should become a real estate agent. As advice goes, this was pretty bad.

As a twenty-five year old real estate agent I was just terrible. I didn’t even do all the post licensing rigmarole because the National Association of Realtors took all my money in exchange for access to house listings and a lapel pin in the shape of an “R”. By the way, it’s pronounced “real-TOR!” and not “reel-AH-tor” as we like to say in the south. Get it right.

Thankfully, neither the guy or the real estate career worked out. While they stewed together in the sewer, I went and got a nice job waiting tables where the lapel pins were shaped like grapes and not like a ridiculous “R”.

A few years later on a cold December night, whilst rattling around in a lonesome stupor helped along by a large bottle of moderately good wine, my mother suggested to me that, perhaps, I could teach yoga. I immediately railed at her about what a horrible idea that is, given that I didn’t think my six or so years of practice constituted a decent level of experience to teach the stuff. Not only that, but there was not a single yoga teacher training academy in Pensacola.

A year later I take her relatively helpful advice, having decided for myself that a career in fitness and wellness could lift me out of the doldrums of food service, which might have inspired the previous year’s malaise. A new career was thus launched after a year of training and in less than three years I find myself enmeshed in the new and budding yoga teacher training programs in Pensacola as an instructor and mentor.

I might add that it took me a year to follow this good advice to go to teacher training, so it is plainly obvious that the speed with which I act on given advice is inverse to how good it is. For example, You say “This apple pie is hot, let it cool before you eat it.” Me – already chewing.

When I began teaching yoga I also started doing hair again. I was working at a high end salon. It was a pretty good gig because I could go teach a yoga class between clients. I could even schedule yoga classes around my budding clientele. However, I was getting advice from two corners; the salon owner advised me to dress like a stylist and less like a fitness professional at beauty boot camp and the yoga studio owner advised me to quit my job and teach yoga full time.

In response, I quit the salon and waited tables on the weekends so I could be all piss and vinegar during the yoga teaching workweek to which I was newly committed. Quitting the salon job was terrible advice. So was leaving the restaurant, which I refused to do, given its ability to pay bills and afford me the luxury of new books, high end cat food and  – ironically – flip-flops made out of yoga mats. This move might have ultimately cost me opportunities, since I didn’t really offer a great show of force in my commitment to yoga.

I’ve maneuvered, like a street magician’s sleight of hand of where’s the marble, around the three jobs of food service, cosmetology and teaching yoga, and the marble that ended up in the magician’s sleeve was teaching. Eventually I had to let something go. I was becoming a cynical instructor secretly hoping no one showed up to class. I took the advice of my own counsel and quit teaching at the studio.

The problem with being a yoga teacher without a studio home is that I sometimes see via the marvel of social media students share their practice. How is this a problem, you might wonder?

Last week I saw a video of a local student kick up into headstand. She was proud of headstand, which is a commendable pursuit and a practice with grounding and depth. It has cautions that come with it, along with important alignment cues and stability practices. One of the things I remember from my own teacher training is the emphasis on  taking care of the cervical spine and the importance of lifting into headstand with control and keeping a neutral neck in shoulder-stand. Kick right the hell up into handstand, put a hole in the wall with your foot if you want, but control is key in headstand.

I thought about leaving a comment on the clip – what do they call those now, gifs? I considered all the ways I might direct, assist or inform but felt uninvited and, quite frankly, like a troll. I have enough of that feeling when I go to Panera Bread and they tell me they are out of sprouted grain rolls for the day and I have to restrain the expression on my face – very troll like.

From my perspective I must, at best, look like an armchair quarterback. At worst, a cynical out of work yoga teacher with control issues. But I am not out of work – not with all those jobs – and if I do have control issues, the issue is with not taking responsibility  for my life sooner.

Yoga is not my main source of income and teaching it is no longer my career. With this realization comes a great bit of freedom, including the ability to teach whatever in the hell kind of class I want because paying my light bill no longer hinges on the number of students who show up. It is my job to reassure and instruct, but not necessarily to make you like me.

This also means I can say whatever I want, in the name of safe and healthy alignment, so I’m going to give everyone some good advice – don’t kick up into headstand. Ask yourself, “What would Iyengar do?” and then do that.

I realized this week, between the dance between biting my tongue about technique and finding empowerment around the freedom of teaching off the clock, that giving up on my profession was the best thing I could have ever done for my practice. I am also renewed in teaching, as any good teacher will tell you, Dear Reader, because the practice informs what instructors are best able to teach.

Here’s a fantastic video on safely practicing headstand. She gives great cues and alignment instruction. https://supersisterfitness.com/safely-properly-headstand-for-beginners/ 

 

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